Serious Warning! Not Having Enough Sleep Can Make You Develop Diabetes

For those of you who do not get between seven to nine hours of sleep everyday, you are creating room for diabetics without knowing it.

If you wouldn’t walk to gradually slip into a diabetic condition then checkout this interesting piece on how lack of sleep to hasten that unwanted move for you.

Inadequate sleep – even moderate reductions of two to three hours for just one week – disrupts blood sugar levels so profoundly that you would be classified as pre-diabetic. Short sleeping increases the likelihood of your coronary arteries becoming blocked and brittle, setting you on a path towards cardiovascular disease, stroke and congestive heart failure.

Strikingly, all it takes is one hour of lost sleep, as demonstrated by a global experiment performed on 1.6 billion people across more than 60 countries twice a year, otherwise known as daylight saving times. In the spring, when we lose one hour of sleep, there is a 24% increase in heart attacks the following day. In the autumn, we gain an hour of sleep opportunity, and there is a 21% reduction in heart attacks. Most of us think little of losing an hour of sleep, yet it is anything but trivial.

Sleep disruption has further been associated with all major psychiatric conditions, including depression, anxiety and suicidality. Indeed, in my research over the past 20 years, we have not been able to find a single major psychiatric condition in which sleep is normal. Science is thus proving the prophetic wisdom of Charlotte Brontë, who stated that “a ruffled mind makes a restless pillow”.

Add the above physical and mental health consequences up, and a scientifically validated link becomes easier to accept: the shorter your sleep, the shorter your life. Recent findings demonstrate that individuals who routinely sleep five hours a night have a 65% increased risk of dying at any moment in time, relative to those getting seven to nine hours a night. The elastic band of sleep deprivation can stretch only so far before it snaps.

 

Read entire article in The Guardian

The Author

Chinenye Nwabueze

Nwabueze is a communication researcher with several years of lecturing experience in Nigerian universities.

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