30 kinds of headlines you will find in newspapers and magazines – Part One (Video)

The newspaper industry is very vibrant with many engaging in depth investigations to come up with good stories to attract audience attention. Headline writing is one key area where the competition is fierce and where audience patronage is often won. Newspapers take headline writing seriously because it does the first job of winning audience attention to a medium.

Here are 30 kinds of headlines you’ll find in newspapers and magazines. We have used examples in the video below to make it easy for you to identify these headlines whenever you see them in a newspaper or magazine. This is the first part of our video on this topic. Subscribe to our channel to be the first to get the second part of this video.

Here’s a summary of the headlines we discussed in this first part of our lecture series on this topic.

Deck Headline

A deck is an extension of the headline

It expands the headline, not duplicate it

Deck provides secondary angle to the news headline

A deck is a rider

Decks summarize the story content so well that visitors can get the gist of the story without reading the text

You don’t repeat a single word from the headline in the deck

A deck is a second layer of headline and it is essential to communicate to today’s audience of flippers and skimmers (who flip past or skim over newspaper or magazine contents).

Kicker

Provides subject of the story

Appears before the main headline (above or by the right side separated with a comma)

Provides a quick background summary of what the headline is all about or what the story is referring to.

Rider

It is an extension of the headline

It expands the headline, not duplicate it

Provides secondary angle to the news headline

Also called the deck

Riders summarize the story content so well that visitors can get the gist of the story without reading the text

You don’t repeat a single word from the headline in the rider

A rider is a second layer of headline and it is essential to communicate to today’s audience of flippers and skimmers (who flip past or skim over newspaper or magazine contents).

 

Example:

Kicker –              ATTACK, EVACUATION OF NIGERIANS

Main Headline –  South Africa Begs Nigeria

Rider –                Ramaphosa’s special envoy in Abuja, apologizes to Buhari

Rider –                Obasanjo urges FG, others to report South Africa to AU

 

Jump Headline

Headline written to indicate that a story is the continuation of a previous one

Most times you find the page where the previous story is contained (continued on page….)

Screaming Headline

Large headline that runs across four or more columns on a page

Sometimes uses exclamation marks

Also called the screamer

 

READ ALSO: 30 kinds of headlines you will find in newspapers and magazines – Part Two (Video)

 

Quotation Headline

A headline that uses quotation from the ‘Who’ element of a story

A headline written from what was said by the main source of a story

The quotation is attributed to a source

Crossline Headline

Single line sentence headline that runs across a story.

It does not always run across the complete width of the columns.

Over-banner Headline

A banner headline that appears above the mast head or nameplate

Also called skyline headline or over-the-roof headline

It is used in extra important occasions

Rarely used by newspaper establishments

Teaser Headline

A short headline used to attract readers’ attention to a story inside the newspaper or magazine

Skyline Headline

A kind of headline that appears above the masthead or nameplate

Also called over-banner headline or over-the-roof headline

Blanket Headline

This is a headline that runs across all columns of a story or a combination of related stories.

It is used to cover all stories written on same theme or related issue.

Sometimes short sub-headlines are used to differentiate segment the story but with one general headline covering them.

Over-the Roof Headline

A kind of headline that appears above the masthead or nameplate

Also called over-banner headline or skyline headline

 

Watch the complete lecture in the video below;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Author

Chinenye Nwabueze

Nwabueze is a communication researcher with several years of lecturing experience in Nigerian universities.

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